Author Archives: pdberger

Photo Tour :: Washington National Cathedral

We have arrived at Chapter 79 of The Lost Symbol:

Washington National Cathedral, Langdon thought, feeling an unexpected anticipation at being back after all these years. Where better to ask about One True God.
“This Cathedral really has ten stone from Mount Sinai?” Katherine asked, gazing up at the twin bell towers.
Langdon nodded. “Near the main altar. They symbolize the Ten Commandments given to Moses on Mount Sinai.”
“And there’s lunar rock?”
A rock from heaven itself. “Yes. One of the stained-glass windows is called the Space Window and has a fragment of moon rock embedded in it.”

The Space Window, Washington National Cathedral (© Julie O'Connor, 2009)

Welcome to the tenth day of Julie O’Connor’s Magical, Mystical, Masonic Photo Tour of Washington, DC. Robert Langdon and Katherine Solomon have given the CIA the slip and reached Washington National Cathedral where they seek answers to the pyramid’s riddle Jeova Sanctus Unus–One True God–from the dean of the cathedral, Reverend Colin Galloway.

Candles in the Cathedral (© Julie O'Connor, 2009)

The Cathedral is a magnificent setting. One can easily imagine Dan Brown taking one of his anonymous tours of DC and being captivated by its possibilities. Here, in Chapter 82 and in true Brownian fashion, is the author’s description of the cathedral’s architectural statistics:

Washington National Cathedral is the sixth-largest cathedral in the world and soars higher than a thirty-story skyscraper. Embellished with over two hundred stained-glass windows, a fifty-three-bell carillon, and a 10,647-pipe organ, this Gothic masterpiece can accomodate more than three thousand worshippers.

Washington National Cathedral, Interior (© Julie O'Connor, 2009)

The space is magnificent. It won’t be long now before Tom Hanks and his yet-to-be-announced female companion are led down the aisle.

Reverend Colin Galloway–dean of the cathedral–looked like he had been alive forever. Stooped and withered, he wore a simple black cassock and shuffled blindly ahead without a word. Langdon and Katherine followed in silence through the darkness of the four-hundred-foot-long nave’s central aisle, which was curved ever so slightly to the left to create a softening optical illusion.

Buy Secrets of The Lost Symbol or download the e-book.

Columbia Begins Work on Lost Symbol Movie

Warren Bellamy: A role made for Morgan Freeman?

The movie version of The Lost Symbol is starting to take shape. Columbia PIctures recently announced that Steven Knight (Dirty Pretty Things) has signed to write the screenplay. Ron Howard and Tom “Robert Langdon” Hanks are yet to sign contracts, but their agreement is doubtless close at hand.

Columbia must be hoping the trio can come up with a better movie than last year’s Angels and Demons, which grossed a paltry $486 million compared to 2006′s Da Vinci Code movie, which grossed $758 million.

No word yet on who will play Warren Bellamy in The Lost Symbol. But the movie’s casting director is in for a tough job if Morgan Freeman says no.

And what about the problem of casting Katherine Solomon? Columbia bosses must be scratching their heads about finding a box office draw to play a female lead who, in the novel, is a few years older than Robert Langdon. Perhaps they should look no further than Meryl Streep? She has had quite a run lately, playing everything from an older woman having an affair with her ex-husband to a vivacious (and slightly potty) Julia Child. Surely, noetic scientist is within her range.

What do you think? Is Tom Hanks the best man to fill Robert Langdon’s shoes? Who would you like to see play Katherine Solomon? And is anyone other than Morgan Freeman capable of playing Warren Bellamy?

A Visual Tour of The Lost Symbol

For many fans of The Lost Symbol, Washington DC will never quite look the same again.

During the past few months, we have highlighted some of the magnificent and unusual locations Dan Brown used in his latest novel in a regular feature, called Julie O’Connor’s Magical, Mystical, Masonic Photo Tour of Washington, DC.

We will complete the tour in the weeks ahead. But for now, we would like to share an encyclopedic photo slideshow, composed of Julie’s images, that provides a total, visual immersion in the world of The Lost Symbol.

Highlights include the House of the Temple, the Washington Monument, the Capitol Rotunda, the Capitol Visitor’s Center, the National Cathedral, the Library of Congress, the George Washington Masonic Memorial, and the US Botanical Gardens. The music, by the way, is taken from Mozart’s Masonic compositions.

Buy Secrets of The Lost Symbol or download it as an e-book.

Secrets of The Lost Symbol Goes Global

Secrets of The Lost Symbol has gone global with the first six of an expected twelve foreign language editions appearing in the UK, Spain, Holland, Brazil, Italy, and Germany:

Order now from your local bookstore or Amazon store.

Another Secrets of The Lost Symbol!

We’re very pleased to announce our inclusion in US News & World Report’s special collector’s edition: Secrets of The Lost Symbol.

The magazine includes our interview with the artist Michael Parkes, whose painting The Three Graces, hides the entrance to Mal’akh’s basement lair in The Lost Symbol.

It also contains our essay by contributing editor Lou Aronica, who explores the story of the co-founding of the Institute for Noetic Sciences–and the birth of noetics–by astronaut Edgar Mitchell in the 1970′s.

Other contributors to our book, featured in the US News & World Report special, include Masonic experts Mark Tabbert and Arturo de Hoyos, historian and Smithsonian specialist Heather Ewing, and Mitch Horowitz, a leading author of spiritual and metaphysical books.

Buy Secrets of The Lost Symbol or download it as an e-book.