Category Archives: Angels and Demons

The Pope’s Pantheon and The Dotted O

A brilliant young computer programmer and code-breaker we know, Billy Gates, reports to us that if some of the numeric sequences on the cover of The Lost Symbol are run through substitution code analysis, it yields multiple possible pairings of words.

When you eliminate the nonsense pairings you are left with only a few likely solutions, the most intriguing of these being “Pope’s Pantheon.”

We expect there to be a number of interesting codes embedded by Dan Brown on the cover of The Lost Symbol and throughout the book.

In my book, Secrets of the Widow’s Son, I explored the subject of pantheons. A pantheon can be any structure intended for the worship of multiple gods. So it is appropriate to keep thinking of that functional definition, without insisting that it fit a physical design.

Dan Brown may have been intrigued when he researched his novels to discover the Panthéon, in Paris, which was the final resting place of Enlightenment thinkers Voltaire and Rousseau and a prominent building during the period when Jefferson visited the French capital.

However, the greatest example of a pantheon, the Pantheon of Rome–which featured prominently in Angels and Demons–is a special design, incorporating a pronounced circular portion and a rectangular portion (the portico). The circular part has a hole in the center of the domed roof called an oculus.

In his books, Dan Brown has called attention to the use of “round churches” by Templars and others, and he set part of the plot of The Da Vinci Code in the Temple Church of London, a genuine Templar church, which has a circular nave attached to a rectangular chancel.

There is a basic echo here in the idea of something round, married to something rectangular or square. If you just keep that concept in mind, you begin to see reverberations everywhere, but particularly in Washington, DC.

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