Tag Archives: Freemasonry

Robert Frost – a Mason?

The New York Times ran the following report recently:

A forgotten Robert Frost manuscript recently turned up in the basement of a Masonic lodge in Methuen, Mass. It’s not a poem or an essay, but rather an attendance book Frost kept while teaching eighth grade at the Second Grammar School in Methuen in 1893. City officials say the book is somewhat the worse for wear, The Boston Globe reported, and they’re applying for a $3,000 grant to restore and rebind it. The entries are apparently all in Frost’s hand as he painstakingly ticked off, day by day, who showed up and who didn’t. At the time Frost himself was only 17, or just a few years older than his pupils, and a recent dropout from Dartmouth College, where he hadn’t even finished his first semester. But teachers didn’t need credentials in those days, and besides, Frost had pull: his mother also taught at Second Grammar. Teaching was the family business. Frost’s father was a teacher and a journalist, and after his death Frost’s mother, who had been a teacher, supported the family by returning to the classroom. She even opened her own private school in Salem, N.H., and, not surprisingly her son, who was already writing and publishing poetry but needed a day job, was hired there too.

But the Times report didn’t indicate any reason why this artifact of the great American poet’s early life would have been found in a Masonic lodge. (In fact, it appears from some accounts that the attendance record was found in the Masonic lodge 20 years ago and has been stored in Methuen’s City Hall since then).

Frost is not listed on any of the web databases that seek to index “famous Masons.” However, Frost’s Mending Wall poem (“Something there is that doesn’t love a wall”) has connoted an affection for stonemasons and the art of wall building to some literary critics. And a number of Masonic writers have used Frost’s The Road Not Taken (“Two roads diverged in a wood, and I— I took the one less traveled by, And that has made all the difference”) as a literary allusion to the difficult path of those on a quest for knowledge and meaning, and for the path of Freemasonry itself.

There is no indication Frost was a Mason, but we’d appreciate hearing from anyone who has a clue as to why this news-making attendance record in Frost’s hand showed up in a Masonic lodge or other thoughts on this bit of history.

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The Pope’s Pantheon and The Dotted O

A brilliant young computer programmer and code-breaker we know, Billy Gates, reports to us that if some of the numeric sequences on the cover of The Lost Symbol are run through substitution code analysis, it yields multiple possible pairings of words.

When you eliminate the nonsense pairings you are left with only a few likely solutions, the most intriguing of these being “Pope’s Pantheon.”

We expect there to be a number of interesting codes embedded by Dan Brown on the cover of The Lost Symbol and throughout the book.

In my book, Secrets of the Widow’s Son, I explored the subject of pantheons. A pantheon can be any structure intended for the worship of multiple gods. So it is appropriate to keep thinking of that functional definition, without insisting that it fit a physical design.

Dan Brown may have been intrigued when he researched his novels to discover the Panthéon, in Paris, which was the final resting place of Enlightenment thinkers Voltaire and Rousseau and a prominent building during the period when Jefferson visited the French capital.

However, the greatest example of a pantheon, the Pantheon of Rome–which featured prominently in Angels and Demons–is a special design, incorporating a pronounced circular portion and a rectangular portion (the portico). The circular part has a hole in the center of the domed roof called an oculus.

In his books, Dan Brown has called attention to the use of “round churches” by Templars and others, and he set part of the plot of The Da Vinci Code in the Temple Church of London, a genuine Templar church, which has a circular nave attached to a rectangular chancel.

There is a basic echo here in the idea of something round, married to something rectangular or square. If you just keep that concept in mind, you begin to see reverberations everywhere, but particularly in Washington, DC.

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